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New National Statistics for Divorce and Cohabitation

View profile for Brian Farrell
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On 8th July 2015 the office for National Statistics released the following details relating to marital status and living arrangements in England and Wales between 2002 and 2014:-

  • In 2014, 51.5% of people aged 16 and over in England and Wales were married or civil partnered while 33.9% were single, never married.Between 2002 and 2014 the proportions of people aged 16 and over who were single or divorced increased but the proportions who were married or widowed decreased
  • The increase between 2002 and 2014 in the percentage of the population who were divorced was driven by those aged 45 and over, with the largest percentages divorced at ages 50 to 64 in 2014.
  • In 2014 around 1 in 8 adults in England and Wales were living in a couple but not currently married or civil partnered; cohabiting is most common in the 30 to 34 age group.
  • More women (18.9%) than men (9.8%) were not living in a couple having been previously married or civil partnered; this is due to larger numbers of older widowed women than men in England and Wales in 2014.

The stand out statistic here is that the largest percentage of divorces now is of those between 50 and 64 years of age.

There are a number of reasons for what are known as ‘silver’ divorces.  Children have left home, one or both parties are now retired and/or they have simply grown apart over the years.Also with people now expecting to live longer, some just cannot see themselves continuing to live with the same spouse for perhaps another 20 or 30 years.

This is far removed from the ‘silver’ generations of the past who viewed that marriage was for life and when that generation was the least, not the most, likely to divorce.

We have a team of divorce specialists across our North East offices. Brian Farrell works from our Barnard Castle and Wynyard offices and specialises in all aspect of Family Law including  divorce and related financial disputes.

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