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Your Digital Afterlife - Let Us Help You Get It In Order

View profile for Joanne Tillotson
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“I must put my affairs in order” ...

is a common and traditional phrase. It conjures up an image of that all important box, containing vital paperwork about one’s finances and personal affairs, all prepared safe and sound for loved ones to tend to if the unthinkable happens.

However, with the dawn of the web, online service and accounts and social media platforms, people need to think about how to manage their affairs differently and above all digitally. With this in mind, Tilly Bailey & Irvine have given serious thought about how we can help people put their digital assets in order.

It is the role of the executors appointed in a Will to deal with any assets of the deceased. This covers the usual assets such as property and  bank accounts etc; but how are executors to deal with online assets such as social media pages and photo libraries with the complexities of different logins and passwords that are only known to the deceased?

Many online companies now have their own procedures on how an online/social media account can be dealt with on death. For instance, Facebook now offers its users a variety of options to allow you to have a digital online presence after death –known as ‘digital afterlife. One of its newest features is a Legacy Contact Feature allowing its users to nominate a person to control a memorial page on death. Yet, the question remains how would your nearest and dearest know that you had considered this or even  set this up?

Most of us now manage our bank accounts online, paying bills and transferring funds from one account to another. You may have an account online that not even your family would be aware of and with no paper trail how are they to be dealt with on death?

The list of online assets that we manage on a daily basis is endless. Here are just a few:

  • Online bank accounts
  • Social media pages -  Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn
  • iTunes/Spotify  account – many of us have a whole catalogue of music downloaded to our favourite gadget
  • Netflix
  • Online gaming accounts
  • PayPal
  • Amazon Prime
  • Online Subscriptions – such as newspapers etc
  • iCloud account

Last year, Partner, Nicola Dalzell wrote an article regarding this very issue providing advice regarding digital assets and how they are managed on death – “What Happens To Our Digital Assets & Online Accounts When We Die?” This article attracted much interest. So much in fact that at Tilly Bailey & Irvine we have taken the initiative to provide you with a simple and effective tool to put your digital affairs in order -  the launch of  My Digital Assets Keepsake.

This helpful straightforward tool will allow you to keep a record not just of online assets and accounts with logins and passwords but also just as importantly those more personal wishes in relation to social media sites and lasting memories.  You can also give special instructions to your executor regarding how you would wish for certain online assets to be dealt with.

For instance, an avid music collector may wish to leave their catalogue of digitally downloaded tracks to a particular person who shares their passion. Or you may wish to leave instructions regarding your social media pages and who you have nominated to created a memorial page, such as a best friend or family member.

As the record will include extremely private and information, such as logins/passwords etc; we recommend that it is kept in a secure place. We encourage our clients to place the original of this document in a sealed envelope with their Will in our strong room which can be handed to the executors on their death.

We would be happy to discuss any of these matters with you including the preparation of a Will which is the fundamental step in putting your affairs in order. Please download our Digital Assets Keepsafe for free here.

 If you would like to speak with a member of the team please do not hesitate to get in touch.

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